Bladder problems during pregnancy? Find out how to deal with them?
Diet and healthPregnancy and childbirth
It takes approx. 2 minutes to read this article

Bladder problems during pregnancy? Find out how to deal with them?

Bladder problems are the bane of many pregnant women. Frequent use of the toilet is a natural occurrence both at the beginning and the end of pregnancy. Unfortunately, for many women it is a very troublesome problem.

Frequent urination

The main problem during pregnancy is frequent urination, which is particularly bothersome especially at the beginning and the end

In the second and third trimester of pregnancy, many women also experience incontinence, which is very often troublesome, especially when the pregnant woman laughs, sneezes or coughs – this is called stress incontinence by doctors. This phenomenon is natural because the uterus during pregnancy increases its volume, putting pressure on other organs, including the bladder

Bladder inflammation – a common problem for many pregnant women

Infections related to the bladder are one of the more common diseases. This situation is caused by:

  • hormonal changes that affect the muscle tone of the urinary system;
  • pressure of the uterus on the bladder;
  • changes in the pH of the vagina,

The most common symptoms of urinary tract infections are:

  • constant urge to urinate,
  • burning sensation while urinating,
  • very frequent passing small amounts of urine,
  • pain,
  • blood in the urine.

Even the smallest bladder infection should not be taken lightly, because untreated bacteria can also take over the kidneys. Untreated urinary tract inflammation can lead to anemia and even premature birth.

How to prevent bladder problems in pregnancy?

During pregnancy, due to hormones, the environment changes from acidic to alkaline, which makes it easier for bacteria to become infected. To avoid bladder problems it is a good idea to:

  • eat cranberries – cranberries are very acidic, so this taste is not to everyone’s liking. If you cannot eat raw cranberries, replace them with: cranberry juice, dried cranberries, cranberry jam and cranberries for meat;
  • take care of intimate hygiene – wash twice a day in a front-to-back direction to avoid transferring bacteria from the anus to the vagina. Use intimate hygiene liquids intended for this purpose;
  • drink at least drink at least 2 liters of fluid a day;
  • do not wear tight underwear and avoid pants made of artificial fibres;
  • maintain good toilet hygiene;
  • exercise your Kegel muscles;
  • add green parsley, celery or celery root to meals.

Main photo: John Looy, source: unsplash.com

Add comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

5 × 5 =

Recommended articles
How to deal with lack of appetite in pregnancy?
How to deal with lack of appetite in pregnancy?
Are you pregnant and struggling with lack of appetite, nausea and vomiting? Read about home remedies that can remedy the problems.
How to talk to children about the climate crisis?
How to talk to children about the climate crisis?
The climate crisis is a topic that is difficult to bring up with a child. So it is worth finding out how to talk to them about what is happening to the place where they live.
What to keep in mind when buying a new school backpack?
What to keep in mind when buying a new school backpack?
Buying a backpack is not at all as simple as it might seem. So what to suggest when shopping to choose a product that will be best for your child?
Latest articles